Psalm 13 — A Familiar Refrain


Like the sunrise,
Complaints follow a darkness,
But precede the day’s light.

Even though God referred to King David as, “A man after my own heart,” the good king didn’t always shine as an icon of virtue. Psalm 13 demonstrates his habit of complaining about his circumstances:

(1b) How long, O LORD? Will you forget me forever? How long will you hide your face from me?
(2) How long must I take counsel in my soul and have sorrow in my heart all the day? How long shall my enemy be exalted over me?

Granted, he whined for good reason; first Saul, then Absalom unjustly pursued him with murder in their eyes. And the Philistines weren’t exactly his friends, either. The next two verses of Psalm 13 typify his initial response to those impending dangers:

(3) Consider and answer me, O LORD my God; light up my eyes, lest I sleep the sleep of death,
(4) lest my enemy say, “I have prevailed over him,” lest my foes rejoice because I am shaken.

At least he didn’t just blubber about his perils. King David understood that God wants to bear all our burdens, so he delivered them right into his Lord’s capable hands. Then, even in his most dejected moments, David demonstrated his attitude of trust, gratitude and praise to God:

(5) But I have trusted in your steadfast love; my heart shall rejoice in your salvation.
(6) I will sing to the LORD, because he has dealt bountifully with me.

Those three elements provide a model for our desperate prayers. Go ahead and gripe all you want; God, in Christ Jesus, experienced every temptation that plagues us, so he understands our need to whine and gripe. But he also requires us to follow the rest of King David’s example, by stating our needs as we understand them, requesting that he, “light up my eyes,” with his divine wisdom, and then trust his steadfast love for his answer to our need.

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