Critique


Capture

On sitting through a TV movie called, MELTDOWN: DAYS OF DESTRUCTION, my only choice for redeeming an otherwise wasted ninety minutes is to draw a spiritual object lesson from the experience.

The scenario has fat, bald, money-grubbing Republican (my surmise – not stated in the movie) Jared Olsen insisting on executing an experiment against the advice of good-guy Nathan. The experiment? Nuke a perfectly innocent asteroid that wasn’t even in danger of crashing into Earth. You know, target practice. You can see the story coming, just like I did; the nuke split the asteroid, with the biggest piece—roughly the size of Iceland—heading Earthbound. When it ricocheted off the atmosphere, all the scientists thought we had dodged a major bullet, but they soon learned that this close encounter of the worst kind had nudged our garden-planet closer to the Sun. Of course, all the flowers, as well as billions of people, began wilting forthwith.

At the top of my list of technical blunders in that flick stands the fact that any change in our solar orbit significant enough to cause temperatures to climb so quickly would have generated such catastrophic, worldwide earthquakes that everyone would have died long before we could develop a corporate sunburn. Add to that, a moon that would have either crashed into earth or set off on its own interplanetary voyage, and you can see that would have been a bad day indeed for everyone concerned.

Don’t worry, the first two blunders of my list are enough to demonstrate the producers’ scientifically careless attitude, so I won’t belabor the point with the rest of my long and boring list. Said careless attitude illustrates the superficial approach that characterizes naturalistic scientists’ observations of the physical universe. Simply put, they make the best observations they can, given technology’s developing state, run a few explanatory theories up the flagpole, shoot down all but one, and reap a Nobel Prize for it. Of course, all scientists are not atheists, but academia pretty much ignores those who refuse to toe the naturalistic line.

Do you ever wonder why so many good church kids graduate from college as atheists? Most of the blame goes to the fact that state-funded higher education is misnamed; it’s not education, but naturalistic indoctrination.

Another great portion of blame falls at the feet of Christian education, which fails to teach church kids how to think critically. The religious establishment believes that the best response to public education’s naturalistic indoctrination is to simply tell kids not to believe it. They’re afraid that teaching our youth critical thinking will cause them to question what they’re taught about God. But guess what; they will anyway. Wouldn’t we be better off teaching young people the correct use of logic? To fear that is to doubt God’s credibility.

Yes, this is a critique, but not of a movie. It’s the church that deserves healthy criticism.

(For a follow-up post, see, Solution.)

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3 thoughts on “Critique

  1. So very right my friend. When I was in college studying religious studies I could not believe the students that were so upset when they were in Bible 101 from a different perspective than Sunday School. How do we accomplish your suggestion before they hit the world of the streets though? Any suggestions?

    • Thanks, Andy. I believe desensitizing our youth to the world’s lies begins in the pulpit, teaching parents that allowing our children to face the world unprepared is the worst kind of sin; we cause them to stumble through our example of self-indulgence, enjoying the very entertainments that weaken their fledgling faith, remaining weak in God’s Word and prayer, and demonstrating before them the worldly attitudes that the Bible prohibits.

      I say all this with three fingers pointed back at myself, as I am among the worst offenders. Thanks for asking those questions, Andy. I see the need to follow up the “Critique” post with these words of explanation.

  2. Pingback: Solution | The Well-Dressed Branch

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