Remember What?

What’s inside YOUR noggin?

I’ve long wondered why I am the way I am. Did we go by alphabetical order in the memory recall and self-control line when I was created? Was it luck of the draw?

King David, by the Holy Spirit’s inspiration, wrote: Psalms 33:14-15 NKJV From the place of His dwelling He looks On all the inhabitants of the earth; (15) He fashions their hearts individually; He considers all their works.

Often I forget about God’s sovereignty, His craftsmanship, His artistic ability. Years ago, like a thunder clap, I realized that God doesn’t make junk, that we aren’t trapped by our bad habits and corrupted self-image. By the Word of His mouth He fashioned my inner self, and He keeps track of all my works. He doesn’t ignore me and He most certainly hasn’t forgotten about me. Any lacking or loss of my faculties is due to sin corrupting His perfect creation.

When David wrote, “He fashions their hearts individually,” he referred to God placing within each individual a hunger for Himself, so regardless what we’ve done and where we are, all we have to do is reach out to Him.

Remember King David’s prayer: Let Your mercy, O LORD, be upon us, Just as we hope in You. (Psalms 33:22 NKJV)

It Seemed Significant At the Time

I can’t count the number of times that I’ve had a thought while reading or listening to the Bible, but because I wanted to finish the reading I failed to write it down. When I return to the spot that jumped out at me, it seems to just blend in with the rest of the passage, and I wonder why it seemed significant.

My memory has never been stellar, but as I age, what memory I had gradually seems to ebb away. Most of my contemporaries will answer my concern with, “Oh posh! You’ve got to expect that as you get older.” Maybe so, but it is none the less frustrating.

Now, what was my point with all this?

Ah, that’s right. I seem to be exchanging my marvelous powers of recall—yeah, right!—for a broader perspective on life. I have always, and still do, pray for my Father to give me His eyes (a nod to Amy Grant here).

So easily I fall into the fleshly trap of viewing people and circumstances through the eyes of carnality. What could be an occasion for growth and blessing, I turn into a thorny problem. Will I ever learn Job’s lesson?

Job 42:1-5
(1) Then Job answered the LORD and said:
(2) “I know that You can do everything, And that no purpose of Yours can be withheld from You.
(3) You asked, ‘Who is this who hides counsel without knowledge?’ Therefore I have uttered what I did not understand, Things too wonderful for me, which I did not know.
(4) Listen, please, and let me speak; You said, ‘I will question you, and you shall answer Me.’
(5) “I have heard of You by the hearing of the ear, But now my eye sees You.”

Before Job’s tribulations he knew of God, and that was enough for Him to be obedient, but his faithfulness during his trials matured his faith and brought him into a personal relationship with his heavenly Father. Job knew, and I’m learning, that my loving heavenly Father never allows trials without a purpose.

Praise God for His loving kindness toward us!

Do as I Say … AND as I Do

Deuteronomy 4:9 Only take care, and keep your soul diligently, lest you forget the things that your eyes have seen, and lest they depart from your heart all the days of your life. Make them known to your children and your children’s children

In a previous post I dealt with taking care to keep our soul diligently. Just as crucial is making the important life-lessons we’ve picked up over the years known to our children and their children.

With that in mind, I must confess that typing with one finger pointed out and three pointed back at my self is not easy. Neither is falling on my face before God in heart-broken repentance for my past failures. But on with my moralizing.

In today’s media-rich climate, teaching any moral lessons to our children and grand children is akin to Mission Impossible. If you are doing your best to walk in God’s Spirit you have essential lessons to impart to them, The first barrier to succeeding in this mission is the liberties we practice in our own lives. Example isn’t the best teacher; it’s the ONLY teacher, for anything we try to teach them will only backfire if our example isn’t consistent with our lessons. Remember, such inconsistency is dangerously akin to hypocrisy, and once established, it’s well-nigh impossible to correct.

One of the hardest truths to live by is this: If we truly love our children we will live the way we hope they will live, especially when we are alone and feel less accountable to them. That means both doing, and NOT doing, according to our instructions. That is the only way God’s love and truths will become real to them.

You know the old adage. It should say, “Do as I say AND as I do.”

For Want of Light

 

On ships of war, the men below decks at night exist in a dim, red world, lest when called to their battle stations in the outer darkness they should succumb to night blindness. In the same way, we must willingly live in relative darkness, so we might fully see what God places before us in His subtle, spiritual light.

Isaiah 50:10-11 New King James Version (NKJV)

10 “Who among you fears the LORD?
Who obeys the voice of His Servant?
Who walks in darkness
And has no light?
Let him trust in the name of the LORD
And rely upon his God.
11 Look, all you who kindle a fire,
Who encircle yourselves with sparks:
Walk in the light of your fire and in the sparks you have kindled—
This you shall have from My hand:
You shall lie down in torment.

Guilty as charged! I would love to be alone in that verdict, but alas, I am anything but.

My confession is true; I have ventured forth into self-generated light, imagining it was from God. I should have heeded Isaiah’s admonition: Who walks in darkness and has no light? Let him trust in the name of the LORD and rely upon his God.

Is trusting active, or passive? It is active, as we discern and reject the world’s—and the self’s—seductions. But it is also passive, as we wait on God’s light, as opposed to trying to generate our own.

We live in a performance-oriented culture, and that drive taints the church’s works. We constantly audit our own productivity, and that of others. We encircle ourselves with sparks, walking in the light of our own fire and in the sparks we have kindled.

Let us not turn our work for our Lord into a competition, always striving to make points against “them,” while refusing to acknowledge the fruit “they” bear, lest they pull ahead of us on some celestial scoreboard.

SANTA CLAUS GRACE?

My previous post laid out some pretty stringent requirements for salvation that seem to leave no room for our human weakness. If that were all of God’s revelation to us, we would be in seriously bad straits. But there’s also this little thing called, “grace,” and it’s not to be taken lightly.

Searching, “did evil,” produced twenty hits in the KJV’s Old Testament. Each time, God judged that generation with some calamity that lasted until Israel begged His forgiveness and repented of their adulterous ways. And each time they repented, God gave them victory over their oppressive enemies. That’s grace.

Popular misconceptions have God either wearing a red suit and long, white beard, or throwing lightening bolts at anyone who steps out of line, but those who seriously read the Old Testament will see the depths of God’s love and grace toward His wayward people. God used all that failure, and all that judgment, simply to show us that we have no hope for salvation outside of His grace.

The fact that you’re reading this indicates your interest in things Biblical. The teaching of God’s inexhaustible grace is the hinge pin of all Bible doctrine.

Here you will find a treatment of God’s grace that, while not exhaustive, is thorough enough that you may learn something about it. Though I recommend the article, please know that I don’t agree with every point the author makes, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that I am right in my conclusions, or that he is wrong. Weigh his propositions by God’s Word. If nothing else, it will give you insight into the teachings of Calvinism.

With all this teaching about God’s grace, remember that He is not Santa, keeping a balance sheet of good and bad boys and girls. From the age of accountability, we are all on God’s “bad list,” and only by obeying the good news of His grace can we hope for eternal life with Him.

Danger: Quicksand!

Psalms 37:23-24 ESV
(23) The steps of a man are established by the LORD, when he delights in his way;
(24) though he fall, he shall not be cast headlong, for the LORD upholds his hand.

To which man does this passage refer? I think it’s addressed to the one who delights in the existing One’s(YHWH’s, Yahweh’s, Jehovah’s, or the LORD’s) Way, which of course is the Lord Jesus Christ (John 14:6). If one delights in Jesus, and His Way, the existing One establishes or directs the course of his life. That can be taken as an absolute statement, as one who delights in God’s Way will not easily go against that inclination. If he does, verse 24 and 1 John 1:9 apply, and he will not be cast headlong to destruction, but the existing One steadies and sustains his hand.

I visualize an explorer blazing a path through the jungle, where he encounters a wide mud bog. Being a careful explorer, he realizes the possibility that it is quicksand, and his Guide cannot show him a way around it. His Guide locates a downed log, long enough to span the bog, and just big enough to do the job. As he mounts the log he finds it precarious at best; he needs his Guide’s steadying hand. Being a klutz, he loses his balance and begins to fall into the quicksand, but his Guide pulls him back onto his narrow path.

What an encouragement, that I don’t need to worry about falling into the “quicksand!” My Guide will keep me on His path despite my human weakness, because I delight in His Way. Of course, this promise excludes anyone who insists on delighting in, and pursuing, his own way.

A Textual Contradiction?

Ancient Hebrew manuscript

Regarding Isaiah 9:3

Here is where various translations diametrically disagree, one taking a positive and another taking a negative disposition on the subject.

The positive are: ASV, Brenton, ESV, GNB, NASB, NKJV, YLT
The negative are: KJV, LEB, Webster

Without an understanding of textual criticism, I perceive a contradiction in the negative rendering, with the clause following it. Why would God tell us first, that He had multiplied the nation, and then that He had not increased its joy, followed by telling us of their joy as in harvest?

Albert Barnes addressed this issue thus:

And not increased the joy – The Masoretes here read in the margin לו  lô “to it,” instead of לא  lo’ “not.” Eleven manuscripts, two of them ancient, have this reading. This reading is followed by the Chaldee Paraphrase, the Syriac, and the Arabic. The Septuagint seems also to have so understood it. So also it is in the margin, and so the connection demands; and it is unquestionably the correct reading. It would then read, ‘thou hast increased for it (the nation) the joy.’ Hengstenberg, however, suggests that the phrase may mean, ‘whose joy thou didst not before enlarge,’ that is, upon whom thou hast before inflicted heavy sufferings. But this is harsh, and I see no reason to doubt that an error may have crept into the text.

I had tentatively sided with the KJV on textual issues, but here is a gross exception to that assumption, where the KJV makes no sense at all in its rendering. Please note that I did not title this piece, “A Biblical Contradiction.” While God faithfully preserves His Word’s meaning and application to our lives, in his sovereignty, he allows us to make mistakes where it contributes to His purposes.

What sayest ye?

Mom’s Colored Maid

Mom’s colored maid

Whoa there, egalitarian*! I hail from a solid Catholic/Democrat family. You have to understand that Political Correctness hadn’t yet been born in the ’50s and ’60s. People of color were just beginning to strive for basic human rights, and I applaud their sacrificial efforts. Truthfully, I am also a person of color: Pink, with blue undertones (According to the makeup expert I used to work with.).

Mom’s “colored maid” was a portable dishwasher painted in coppertone—no, not the tanning lotion—and equipt with a detailed set of instructions for its proper use. What brings me to this distant memory is the dirty dishes I found in my apartment’s dishwasher, after the wash cycle had finished. Their state contrasts starkly with the photos of sparkling clean dishes illustrated in the promotional material that dishwasher and detergent manufacturers publish to sell their wares. The problem? My housemate failed to follow the instructions faithfully. You know, the one about rinsing everything thoroughly before placing it into the dishwasher. And conversely, never try to wash items encrusted with dried-on food in the dishwasher, if you hope to have them come out sparkly-clean, as per the promotional material.

Perhaps you’ve guessed that this post isn’t about sanitizing dishes. It’s about following our Manufacturer’s instructions, such that our souls will come out of this life sparkly-clean.

Jesus and His letter-writing apostles gave us perfectly clear instructions as to how we must conduct ourselves to please His Father, and live with Him in life eternal. If you want to meet Jesus sparkling clean, you must follow His User Manual to the best of your ability; shortcuts will leave you encrusted with dried-on sin, unfit for His use.

Now that sounds pretty severe, I’ll admit. Without God’s loving grace, none of us would have a marshmallow’s chance in a dishwasher of joining our Savior in eternity. Please don’t risk missing out by taking God’s grace for granted. You’ll never be perfect in your body of flesh, but to be satisfied with your imperfection means you just don’t get it.

Any questions? Read 1 Peter 1:13-16 Therefore, preparing your minds for action, and being sober-minded, set your hope fully on the grace that will be brought to you at the revelation of Jesus Christ. (14) As obedient children, do not be conformed to the passions of your former ignorance, (15) but as he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, (16) since it is written, “You shall be holy, for I am holy.” (Leviticus 11:44)

The Weeping Prophet

So, here’s the story: Last night I went to bed with hopes of falling asleep without delay, but as I lay there communing with my Creator, I began praying for heart-holiness, both for myself and for His church. As often happens when I pray for Christ-likeness, I began weeping, and the more I contemplated the contrast between Christ and myself, the more my tears flowed. I heard myself sobbing, both from grief and gratitude; I felt a sense of the Holy Spirit’s grief about my soulish stubbornness, and unbearable gratitude for God’s grace despite my failure to apprehend the victory I have in Christ Jesus.

Then, this morning’s Our Daily Bread devotional cited Lamentations 3:1-6, 16-25, where the weeping prophet Jeremiah mourned Jerusalem’s destruction and the Jews’ subsequent captivity. So in typical fashion, I lumped both experiences into a single conceptual stew.

God is disciplining His church in much the same way that He disciplined His people Israel, albeit with His New Covenant grace.

  • As Jeremiah cried out warnings about Israel’s wandering ways, God’s New Testament writers warn His church about our own carnality.
  • As Israel ignored the prophet’s warnings, most of today’s church lie comfortably in our worldly affluence, enjoying our Sunday religious lift while snoring through our godly preachers’ warnings.
  • As Babylon destroyed Jerusalem, popular culture is destroying the institutional church.
  • As Babylon carried Israel’s intelligentsia into captivity, the world system is co-opting the church’s theologians.
  • As Babylon absorbed Israel into its own culture, the world system is defiling God’s church through our preoccupation with its entertainments, its trendy styles, and its pursuit of youthful image.

Though we have much reason to grieve, we have far more reason to rejoice; none of this surprises our omniscient God, and His plan for our triumph over the world system is, and always has been, in place. Yes, I still mourn for those of His church who will never awaken from their slumber, but I rejoice for the faithful remnant who heed His warnings, becoming incorruptible salt and prevailing light for this stale and dark world. Like God’s people Israel, the church’s exile is only temporary, and we have the Great Hope of our eternal homecoming, where our tears will cease and we will commune with our Lord Jesus face-to-face.

A Hard Pill To Swallow

My thousand milligram vitamin C tablet gives me fits when trying to swallow it. The stupid thing begins dissolving before I can gulp it down, so it sticks in my throat until I can gulp enough water to break it free. But vitamin C pills aren’t the only supplements that are hard to swallow.

(1 Peter 2:12) Keep your behavior excellent among the Gentiles, so that in the thing in which they slander you as evildoers, they may because of your good deeds, as they observe them, glorify God in the day of visitation.

Thank the New American Standard Bible for that awkward wording, but its meaning is quite close to the original language. Semantics aside, today’s church needs to play catch-up regarding, “the thing(s) in which they slander [us] as evildoers.” Such things are too numerous to list here, but the, “excellent behavior,” in that verse does not mean acting “Christian.” It means, “winsome goodness,” and most of today’s church could never be accused of that.

(1 Peter 2:13) Submit yourselves for the Lord’s sake to every human institution, whether to a king as the one in authority,

Here is the abrasive coating for our hard-to-swallow pill. Fallen humanity does not easily submit to authority of any kind, and least of all to God, as our great-great-great … grandparents so aptly demonstrated. Here again, to see apparently moral people with issues in that area, all we need to do is take an honest look at today’s church. Because we’re “saved,” we think we have a free pass to heaven regardless what we do in the flesh. But for God’s perspective, we need to flash back to His command in verse twelve: Maintain winsome goodness among outsiders … (my rendering; look it up, it’s pretty close).

(1 Peter 2:14) or to governors as sent by him for the punishment of evildoers and the praise of those who do right.

Apostle Paul, in Romans 13:1-8, said the governing authorities bear the sword to bring down God’s wrath against evildoers, giving us ne’er-do-well human beings incentive to behave. While this is true for all people, it applies even more directly to Christ-followers, as outsiders are all too aware of our higher, Biblical moral standard. Again, flash back to verse twelve; when they watch us behaving badly toward one another, or anyone else for that matter, we’ve just proved they are right in their negative opinions about us, and therefore about God.

(1 Peter 2:15) For such is the will of God that by doing right you may silence the ignorance of foolish men.

According to Psalm 14:1, “The fool says in his heart, ‘There is no God.'” Christ-followers must do what is right, not from fear of earthly authorities, but from fear of God. Jesus said, “Do not fear those who kill the body but are unable to kill the soul; but rather fear Him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” (Matthew 10:28)

Go ahead, gulp that Scriptural pill right down, so you can shut the fools’ mouths.